A Pilot Study of the Early Experience of Consultant Psychiatrists in the Implementation of the Mental Capacity Act 2005: Local Policy and Training, Assessment of Capacity and Determination of Best Interests

Ajit Shah, Chris Heginbotham, Bill Fulford, Natalie Banner, Karen Newbigging, Mat Kinton

Abstract


The Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) was partially implemented in April 2007 and fully implemented in October 2007 in England and Wales (with the exception of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards which were implemented in April 2009). The government estimated that up to 2 million adults in England and Wales may have issues concerning their decision-making capacity (henceforth ‘capacity’), and these will included 840,000 people with dementia, 145,000 people with severe learning disability, 1.2 million people with mild to moderate learning disability and 120,000 people with severe brain injury. Additionally, the prevalence of schizophrenia, mania and serious depression are 1%, 1% and 5% respectively, and some of these individuals may also lack capacity. Moreover, up to 6 million family and unpaid carers are estimated to provide care or treatment for individuals lacking capacity. Furthermore, many other people who do not lack capacity may use aspects of the MCA for future planning.


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.19164/ijmhcl.v0i19.251

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Copyright (c) 2015 Ajit Shah, Chris Heginbotham, Bill Fulford, Natalie Banner, Karen Newbigging, Mat Kinton

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