Assisted dying and Lord Falconer’s recommendations; to what extent should medical and public opinion be considered when amending the law relating to assisted dying?

Dein Lowdon, Iseult McGrory, Calvin Rowley, Colm Taylor

Abstract


Assisted dying in the UK is a controversial topic, this is due to a massive peak in public and medical interest in the topic. This is because of two recent Landmark cases Tony Nicklinson and Debbie Purdy. These campaigners for the right to die were arguing cases associated with the prosecution of their spouses assisting in their suicide which is illegal under the Suicide Act 1961.


The biggest debate on assisted dying is whether you should have the right to be assisted in dying. This is a very controversial topic which has been contested by new bills presented to parliament such as Lord Falconer’s Bill: Assisted Dying (2014). This was the biggest contest ever to the law on assisted dying. The aim for our research project is to highlight issues with the law; analysing where the law that could be reformed. We will look specifically at how medical and public opinions could be considered when amending the law relating to assisted dying.


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.19164/sjppar.v1i1.796

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Copyright (c) 2019 Dein Lowdon, Iseult McGrory, Calvin Rowley, Colm Taylor

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